Troubleshoot Guide

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Residential Oil

This guide is for Residential Oil Burners using a GeniSys Control.

1. Burner will not start

Symptom A
No Lights on the GeniSys Primary Control
Cause 1 – No power to burner

Action: Correct power supply.
Notes: You will know there is voltage on L1 and L2  because all of the lights will blink for 1 second, then turn off, once the control is powered up.

Symptom B
The lights on the GeniSys Primary Control come on for 1 second when powered up, then turn off
Cause 1 – Verify there is 120v at L1 to L2 and Limit to L2

Action: If a boiler control powers 120v to Limit circuit of the Genisys Control : Verify there is 120v present at Limit to L2
Additional Actions: A jumper wire will be needed across TW / TR in this set up.

Cause 2 – Lack of continuity across TW and TR

If a Thermostat is connected to TW / TR: Jumper TW and TR, If the burner starts then check your thermostat. It needs to close the circuit.
120v needs to be at L1 to L2 and Limit to L2.

Symptom C
Flame light is on
Cause 1 – The cad cell (flame detector) is seeing light

Action: Verify there is no apparent light, Remove cad cell wires from the back of the control. The lights should go out.
Additional actions: If the light remains on, replace the control If the light goes off, replace the cad cell. For more information, read Troubleshooting the Cad Cell.

Symptom D
Red reset button is blinking
Cause 1 – The control is in a soft lockout

Action: Push the reset button.
Additional actions: The control locks out for a few reasons: Either an unacceptable or no flame signal, a flame during pre-purge or too many recycle attempts.
Notes: The GeniSys is looking for 0 to 1600 Ohms from the cad cell. For more information, read Troubleshooting the Cad Cell.

Symptom E
Red reset button stays on solid
Cause 1 – The control is in a hard lockout

Action: If the control locks out three times without completing a successful call for heat, the control enters Restricted (Hard) Lockout.
Additional actions: Hold the reset button for 15 seconds until the red light shuts off to reset from a Restricted Lockout.
Notes: This should be done by a Qualified Service Technician.

2. Burner runs, then stops and re-cycles

Cause 1 – Flame is present but the cad cell has weak or intermittent signal

Action: Check and correct flame sensing circuit (cad cell and wiring).
Additional actions:
Notes: For more information, read Troubleshooting the Cad Cell.

Cause 2 – Flame failure

Action: Check and correct fuel supply, proper flue and chamber draft and air settings.
If you are using a Cleancut pump (A2EA6527), check the resistance value (ohms) of the valve coil. It should be 450 ± 10 ohms.
Additional actions: Do a vacuum test on the oil supply line.
Notes: Single stage pumps can pull 6″ of vacuum on a one pipe system, 12″ on a two pipe system. Pump Example: (A2EA6527) A means Single stage.
Two stage pumps can pull 12″ of vacuum on a one pipe system, 17″ on a two pipe system.
Pump Example: (B2EA6550) B means Two stage.

3. Burner has a whining noise while running

Cause 1 – Air in the fuel supply line

Action: Bleed oil pump.
Additional actions: If noise persists: put on a vacuum gauge to see if there is a restriction in the oil supply line.
For more information, read Successfully Locating Suction Line Leaks.

4. Vibration of burner

Cause 1 – Blower or motor imbalance (burner shakes whenever blower runs).

Action: Check that blower is tight on motor shaft, has no missing balance weights, no obvious damage to blower wheel.
Additional actions: Make sure the motor is seated properly.

Cause 2 – Combustion pulsation (burner shakes when burner is firing)

Action: Check and correct: excess air level, head setting, correct blower wheel size, pressure fluctuations coming to furnace from flue stack (add a barometric), un-approved boiler application (furnace / boiler too small).

5. Flame appearance not right

Cause 1 – Flame size – too big

Action: Check and correct: excess air is low (low O2 or high CO2), rate is high, operation at high elevation (flame expands in low barometric pressure), flue gas recirculation, cold furnace.
Additional actions: Refer to the Residential Oil Spec Guide.

Cause 2 – Flame size – too small

Action: Check and correct: excess air is high (high O2 or low CO2), rate is low, furnace has a lot of refractory (re-radiated heat speeds up flame and shrinks its size).
Additional actions: Refer to the Residential Oil Spec Guide.

Cause 3 – Lopsided flame – not centered in appliance

Action: Check and correct: Nozzle line assembly not centered in air tube, Nozzle Plugged, furnace flow pattern (flame drawn toward furnace outlet), furnace refractory pattern (re-radiated heat from refractory speeds up flame), flame buoyancy in furnace (greater influence in cold furnace).
Additional actions: Refer to the Residential Oil Spec Guide.

Cause 4 – Flame color – too orange

Action: Always use properly calibrated instruments to set combustion. A yellow flame is normal. Orange flames indicate the fuel/air mix ratio is not correct, not enough air (low excess air), or too big of a nozzle for the burner set up.
Additional actions: Refer to the Residential Oil Spec Guide.

6. Flue gas analysis not right

Cause 1 – High CO

Action: Normal CO for cast iron boilers is less than 50 PPM, and usually 10 PPM or less. If greater, check and correct: excess air (O2 or CO2), burner head and nozzle combination, insertion depth in short furnaces, flame impingement on damaged refractory, high draft (pulling partially burned products from the base of the flame), cold furnace, greatly over-sized furnace.

Cause 2 – CO2 – too high with air settings at specified opening

Also O2 – too low with air settings at specified opening

Action: Specified air settings are a guideline for start-up, don’t be afraid to change it. Normal CO2 is 11 to 12% (refer to the appliance manual). If high CO2, check and correct: adequate air supply to boiler room, boiler / furnace draft, firing rate (using a pump pressure gauge and a manometer).

Cause 3 – CO2 (O2) – changes from one day to the next

Action: Changes of about 0.5% CO2 (1% O2) are normal. Boiler draft changes (outdoor temperature and wind conditions). If CO2 (O2) changes exceed 0.5% look for mechanical problems with fuel pressure regulation, draft control, or the burner’s blower system. A service log of burner settings and performance is recommended.

7. Rated capacity not obtainable

Cause 1 – Not enough air to make rate (high CO2)

Action: Check and correct: adequate ventilation to support all equipment, high furnace pressure, full opening of burners air shutter and band, debris obstructing air shutter and band, correct air guide or inlet, blower wheel not tight on motor shaft, correct blower wheel adjustment, combustion air leakage from burner.
Additional actions: Verify the burner specification, Check burner head and nozzle. Refer to the Residential Oil Spec Guide.

Cause 2 – Too much air (low CO2) – closing air does not make the CO2 go up

Action: Verify the burner specification, Check burner head, nozzle and if a low firing rate baffle should be used.
Additional actions: Refer to the Residential Oil Spec Guide.

Commercial Gas

Coming soon.

System Controls

Coming soon.

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